Drone #3

It just had to be done.

As soon as I saw the DJI promotional video showing off their latest offering I knew it would be the one for me. The compact design, the convenience of size and the apparent ease of flying was just too tempting to ignore.

But I’ve already got a drone I hear you say!

Well yes, the upgrade from my first drone to the DJI Phantom 3 Standard was a fantastic step up and sparked an interest in aerial photography and also revitalised me back into video creation. But I soon realised the entry-level drone was exactly that…aimed at beginners and I was getting frustrated with its limitations. As the cheapest model DJI made, it lacked features and I often found that it would lose connection and instigate the ‘return to home’ function even if the drone was close by.

So I had been considering upgrading anyhow, probably to the P3P (professional) which had a better camera, improved WiFi connectivity and more advanced flying features. It also meant I could keep the existing spare battery I bought for the P3S, saving a few quid too.

But there was always the disadvantage with the Phantom series…their size. In order to safely carry the drone around it needed a backpack, and a large one at that. Walking along the street got me some strange looks, with one guy even asking whether I was training to go into the army! I would have loved to have taken the quadcopter on our holiday to Turkey but the size of the bag was just too big and would have certainly raised interest from the security guys.

mavic-proSo when DJI announced the release of the Mavic Pro, I knew it was just what I was looking for. It is such a clever design, the size was small enough fit into a coat pocket and the features were so advanced for something so compact.

The only thing was the price; almost three times the amount I paid for the PS3.

So I hesitated…for a day!

And then bit the bullet and preordered, paying the full price up front.

DJI gave an expected shipping date of mid-October but it was soon apparent they had wildly miscalculated the popularity of their latest offering and soon social media was muttering that there was going to be delays. To be fair to DJI they did state early on that orders would be on a first-come-first-served basis but I really didn’t expect it would have a dramatic impact on delivery times. Of course, mid-October turned into November and with no news on the impending shipping I was resigned to the fact that I would have to stick with the Phantom for the foreseeable future. I had been tracking other customers deliveries on a socially-shared spreadsheet but the shipments were erratic and difficult to judge when mine would be ready to send out.

And then on Saturday I received the mail I had been waiting for; notice that the Mavic had been shipped. Yeah!

I was given tracking information and an expected delivery date of Wednesday and so logged on to the DHL website and followed the parcel from China, through Hong Kong and Belgium, arriving into the UK via East Midlands airport on Sunday night before being shipped to Birmingham, ready for delivery. And on Monday morning I got a ‘parcel out for delivery’ notice, less than 48 hours from leaving Shenzhen. Incredible.

And so last night I savoured the unboxing and managed maiden flight, albeit in the living room for just a minute. And I am so impressed!

Unfortunately the rotten weather and shortness of the daylight hours meant no chance of flying properly today but hopefully I’ll get the opportunity to get out and do some flying on Friday as I have the day off. And then next weekend we’re off to Jersey for a few days to see Abby and I’m definitely including my little drone in my carry on bag.

Getting braver but it could’ve all ended in disaster!

So with a month of flying under my belt I thought it was about time I expanded my flying repertoire by trying to get some cinematic shots, following some techniques I’d seen on YouTube (the best place to learn for free of course!).

Armed with my drone, the dog and a can of Jungle Formula I headed off to the local gravel pit adjacent the River Nene for some early morning quadcoptering (I know it’s not a proper word but ‘droning’ isn’t much better 🙂 )

Anyhow, I had pre-planned my shots for two locations; one from the side of the Thrapston gravel pit and the second from the river bank and fortunately neither had any fishing men nearby (both locations are popular with piscatorial folk). Both flights required flying over water, which I’d only done once before and so it was with nervousness that I sent the Phantom up for the first time.

Here is the first flight (edited on the DJI app so click here to view). The quality isn’t brilliant but I think that’s due to the app not the drone.

Mission one accomplished we moved on to location two, a short distance to the river bank. Here I wanted a slightly different shot and the plan was to do a flyover up the river but the shot didn’t quite come off so I tried another selfie with Rio.

Here’s the second film, this time posted on YouTube.

I was quite pleased with that one 🙂

And so on to last night and with the evening brightening up, I took the opportunity to get out for an hour and go explore. I headed for a local footpath I’d never been to before as it looked a quiet location and would be idea for flying.

I also took my handheld video camera this time as one of the YouTube channels suggested using footage taken from the ground to enhance the filming. It was a challenge at first to control the drone and the camera but I will agree it does add something extra to the overall quality of the film.

And so to the near disaster…

I spend some time flying around and practicing some flyovers and other filming techniques before heading back to the first field for more of the same before the second battery went flat. Just before I finished for the evening I decided on one last flyover and it nearly ended up…. well rather than give the game away take a look at the longer edited version of the film I made…

My heart nearly sank as my pride and joy nearly came a cropper but thankfully all turned out well in the end. A lesson learned to be a bit more careful in future!

I also made a shortened version which I posted on Facebook which gives the near-fail a bit more of a dramatic edge.

I am continually researching new places to go and fly; the Peak District is one of my possible destinations but it might have to wait until the kids go back to school as there’s bound to be too many people there time this time of the year.

Windmills of Your Mind

Ever since the nearby wind farm was built a few years ago I have been fascinated by the technology and the turbines ability to be able to work so efficiently despite their enormous size. They look so big from a distance and rarely are they ever still, even with the lightest of breezes, very clever technology.

The original ten turbines at Burton Wold Wind Farm near Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire were so successful in their electricity generation that they recently added a further nine, and now the site is able to generate almost 50% of the power requirements for the Kettering district.

But getting close to them to have a better look is not so easy; I think the owners are not keen for the public to get near for fear of them suffering damage or for public safety reasons. From the main roads that surround the farm there are signs that say ‘KEEP OUT’ and ‘No Entry Private Property’ and so it was with a bit of trepidation that I ventured out with my drone to see if I could get a closer look.

I had already done some homework and surveyed the local ordinance survey map and found that a public footpath went close to an abandoned stone quarry, which also just happened be be adjacent then wind farm too. Two birds etc…

So on Sunday evening I headed out for some quadcopter flying exploration.

Getting to the edge of the quarry/wind farm wasn’t too bad; clearly the footpath wasn’t a well trodden route and a bit overgrown but I soon found a clearing where I could launch from. After takeoff, initially I surveyed the old quarry but it was overgrown and pretty uninteresting so instead turned the camera towards the wind turbines to record some great shots looking across the site from the high vantage point. I was of course careful not to encroach the fields, keeping the drone directly above my head all the time in flight.

After a few minutes I brought the aircraft back down and moved further around the footpath so I could get some shots facing south towards the original turbines. Again, I managed to get some good footage before bringing it back down. It was at that point I stopped and listened to the turbine slowly rotating and it was only then I could appreciate the calmness of the electricity generation, the near silent whoosh as the blades rotated.

I recorded a few filler shots from my iPhone before heading back home, eager to check out the footage I’d shot and wasn’t disappointed by the results.

Here’s the final video.